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Burmese Breed Description

This Burmese Breed Description Article is Listed in Burmese Cat Breed Information

Burmese Breed Description

Burmese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed Description The Burmese originated from Thailand, and all Burmese can trace their ancestry to a cat named Wong Mau, who arrived in the United States in the 1920s. The Burmese was accepted for CFA studbook registration in 1936, but was not accepted for championship status until 1957. Burmese is a lively, affectionate, and even-tempered cat with a sleek, glossy coat. They are deceptively heavy due to their muscularity. They continue to be playful long into adulthood and old age.Though the original color of the American-type Burmese is solid sable brown, other colors (not recognized in all associations) include blue, champagne, platinum, and tortie colors. American Burmese are commonly bred in two types: traditional and contemporary, the latter being a more rounded look. They are only accepted in the traditional four colors of sable, champagne, platinum, and blue. The European (Foreign) Burmese can be found in brown, chocolate, red, cream, and tortie colors, whereas the American-type Burmese may only be bred in the traditional four colors. Interesting breed fact: Burmese studbook registration in CFA was actually suspended from 1947 to 1953 to end the practice of outcrossing Burmese to Siamese. Interestingly enough, cross-breeding Siamese and Burmese is what later produced the Tonkinese breed. The ironic part about this is that Wong Mau, the mother of the Burmese breed, is now widely believed to have been a Burmese-Siamese cross...

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Burmese Breed Profile

This Burmese Breed Profile Article is Listed in Burmese Cat Breed Information

Burmese Breed Profile

Burmese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed Description In the early 1930’s, Dr. Joseph Thompson of San Francisco acquired an attractive walnut-brown female from Burma which he named Wong Mau. Through selective breeding to Siamese, it was established that the Burmese is a distinct breed. Lighter colored kittens were occasionally produced and eventually the American breeders requested recognition from CFA for these “dilute” colors; first, as another breed named Malayan, then later as a dilute division of Burmese. The four colors recognized by CFA are: sable, champagne, blue and platinum.Burmese carry surprising weight for their size and have often been described as “bricks wrapped in silk.” Their coats are very short, satin-like in texture, and generally require little grooming other than daily petting. There is a range in Burmese head and body type; the more compact cats with the rounder heads are seen in the show ring. Burmese have large, expressive eyes that are great pools of innocence and seductive appeal, irresistible in effect.    These eyes are their most persuasive weapon in an arsenal of endearing traits that mask an awesome power to hypnotize their owners into life-time love affairs through which they effortlessly rule their families.As kittens, Burmese are quite lively. They often seem clumsy when they attempt feats beyond their capabilities and land on their rears with solid little thumps. They will be playful well into adulthood. As Burmese grow, their high intelligence emerges and their own individual personalities start to unfold. They mature into charming, resolute executives who move in and take over a household, running it efficiently with those big eyes and a velvet paw. If encouraged, many Burmese converse with their humans, using soft, sweet voices (they are neither loud nor raucous). They are good with children, will tolerate the family dog, and if introduced to it at an early age as something pleasant, most will enjoy traveling in a car. Burmese are extremely people-oriented; their personalities are almost dog-like in a tendency to shadow their owners and in a desire to give and receive affection. Many Burmese have delighted their “humans” by learning to retrieve. They love warm laps and caressing hands and enjoy cuddling up in bed either under the covers or on top of their favorite persons. They delight in helping to manage the house. Some of their favorite chores are assisting with paper work or reading (by sitting on top of the material), or going into cupboards (to demonstrate where things ought to be). Typically, Burmese are always with people. The females tend to request center stage and take an active role in ruling the household. The males prefer to supervise from the lap position, are more laid back and less opinionated. If emotionally slighted by their owner’s obtuseness,...

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Burmese Cat

This Burmese Cat Article is Listed in Burmese Cat Breed Information

Burmese Cat

Burmese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed Description The Burmese is a breed of domesticated cats descended from a specific cat, Wong Mau, who was found in Burma in 1930 by Dr. Joseph G. Thompson. She was brought to San Francisco, California, where she was bred with Siamese males. This breed was first recognized in 1936 by the CFA. Due to a dispute by Siamese breeders, who regarded the Burmese as a poorly coloured Siamese rather than a distinct breed, registration was suspended by the CFA between 1947 and 1953. The breed was recognised by the UK Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in 1952. The Burmese is a breed of domesticated cats descended from a specific cat, Wong Mau, who was found in Burma in 1930 by Dr. Joseph G. Thompson. She was brought to San Francisco, California, where she was bred with Siamese males. This breed was first recognized in 1936 by the CFA. Due to a dispute by Siamese breeders, who regarded the Burmese as a poorly coloured Siamese rather than a distinct breed, registration was suspended by the CFA between 1947 and 1953.    The breed was recognised by the UK Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in 1952. The Burmese is a foreign shorthair. They have yellow or light green eyes and a very short satiny coat. They are heavier than they look, as they are very muscular. By the standards of pedigreed cats they are long-lived, many reaching 16 to 18 years. Burmese have very strong voices and are very affectionate, forming a strong bond with their owners. Other characteristics include an inclination to climb curtains and sit on doors. They are easily trained to use a scratching post to help conserve the owner’s furniture and carpets. Burmese cats are very friendly and curious even towards complete strangers. They are athletic, brave and humorous, and may show remarkable ingenuity, particularly in finding warm places. Burmese cats tend to follow their owners everywhere. Some Burmese may like fruit or vegetables. They do not need to be groomed; petting is enough. They are loyal and respectful to their owners. Even when older, Burmese cats will be playful. Originally, Burmese cats were exclusively brown (sable), but years of selective breeding have produced a wide variety of colours. Different associations have different rules about which of these count as Burmese. Burmese cats are known for being sociable and friendly with humans, as well as intelligent. They are very vocal, and often call to their owners. The Burmese is considered a foreign shorthair in the United States. Accepted eye colour for the breed is gold or yellow, although interbreeding with Siamese may lead to blue or green. Blue eyes or teal (“aqua”) eyes, are genetically impossible in a...

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