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Siamese Breed Description

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Siamese Breed Description

Siamese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed History | Breed Description The breed is from Thailand (originally known as Siam) and was first imported to Great Britain in the mid-1880s. The first known Siamese cat was imported from Bangkok as a gift from the consul of Siam to the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes and lived in the White House. They were an immediate success, and appeared in the earliest cat shows in both countries. The Siamese is distinguished by its brilliant blue eyes and its colored “points” (ears, face, tail and feet) which provide a striking contrast to its light-colored body. The show-quality Siamese display a very long, slender body type, and a long, wedge-shaped head with huge ears.    Some breeders work with a more moderate, rounded type of Siamese, called either the Traditional or Applehead Siamese. Those who are looking for this rounded Siamese type are encouraged to view the list of Traditional Siamese breeders. It is vocal, lively, and affectionate. The breed can be very demanding and should not be left alone for long periods of time. Daily play and interaction are critical to a Siamese’s emotional and mental well-being. Active feline companionship will help keep a lonely Siamese happy, but there is no substitute for human interaction as well. This breed is not for those looking for a quiet companion — Siamese are intelligent and if you don’t give them something to do, they will find something to do instead! Siamese were originally recognized in the solid seal, blue, chocolate, and lilac point colors. In some associations, additional colors and patterns are accepted as part of the Siamese breed, particularly outside the US and Canada, while other associations call these Colorpoint Shorthair. Those who are looking for point colors other than these traditional four are encouraged to visit the list of Colorpoint Shorthair...

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Siamese Breed History

This Siamese Breed History Article is Listed in Siamese Cat Breed Information

Siamese Breed History

Siamese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed History | Breed Description The Traditional Siamese is an intelligent, people-oriented cat which enjoys human companionship – whether it be as a lap warmer or chasing a toy. They are inquisitive and friendly, and like nothing better than to sit in the middle of something you are trying to read. They talk to their people in an affectionate, conversational way, With their calm temperaments, they are well-adapted to life in either a house or an apartment. They are not in perpetual motion – they have a fairly balanced activity level and are just as happy to chase a toy as to curl up in your lap for a snooze. The Siamese is considered by many to be a “natural” breed – one that developed without the intervention of man. Pictures of seal-point Siamese cats appear in the manuscript “Cat-Book Poems”, written in Siam (now Thailand) sometime between 1350 and 1700.    There are a great many legends regarding the origin of the breed – especially the crossed eyes and kinked tails. According to some of the legends, the Siamese cat guarded Buddhist temples and was considered sacred – and was only kept by priests and royalty. The first Siamese cats appeared in the West in the mid-to-late 1800s. Though initially described as “an unnatural, nightmare kind of cat”, they quickly became popular with fanciers, even though these early cats were delicate and subject to health problems. These first cats had crossed eyes and kinked tails, characteristics which are now considered faults, and have almost completely disappeared as a result of careful breeding. Photographs from the late 1880s of some of the first cats to be imported from Siam show the thick, round heads and solid, muscular bodies that distinguish the Traditional Siamese from today’s show Siamese. As the Siamese breed has developed over the years, some breeders have preferred the rounder look, while others have preferred a slender look with a wedge-shaped head. During the 1950s and 1960s, the differences became even more pronounced: show breeders developed an extremely slender cat with a very long, triangular head, almond-shaped eyes, and flaring ears. This look caught on with show-oriented Siamese breeders and with judges. Other breeders, who did not like the new look, continued to breed the larger, round-headed cats. These “Traditional” breeders found that their cats were no longer competitive in the show ring and stopped showing. A great many also stopped registering their cats, though they continued their breeding programs with their existing purebred Siamese stock. Today, Traditional Siamese cats are somewhat rare, though they seem to be making a comeback, as the breed is popular with pet buyers. It should be pointed out that Traditional Siamese are purebred cats, descended...

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Siamese Breed Profile

This Siamese Breed Profile Article is Listed in Siamese Cat Breed Information

Siamese Breed Profile

Siamese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed History | Breed Description The Siamese is one of the oldest recognized and established breeds of cat. The breed is from Thailand (originally known as Siam) and was first imported to Great Britain in the mid-1880s. The first known Siamese cat was imported from Bangkok as a gift from the consul of Siam to the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes and lived in the White House. They were an immediate success, and appeared in the earliest cat shows in both countries. Siamese have fascinated folks around the world since they were first officially exported from Thailand, or as it was known then Siam, in the late eighteen hundreds. Their sleek lines, striking color contrast, finely chiseled aristocratic heads, deep blue almond eyes, and short silky coats make them living art. Combine this beauty with acute intelligence, inquisitive personality and a loving nature and you have the essence of the Siamese cat.    The first Siamese to appear in England were a gift from Siam to an ambassador who brought them home. They began appearing in English cat shows almost immediately, and in American shows by the early twentieth century. Seal points, still the best known variety, were the first to arrive. With their seal brown, almost black extremities and their pale fawn bodies, they were sensational. While chocolate points, with creamy white bodies and milk chocolate legs, tail, mask and ears did appear from time to time, it was the blue point that gained official recognition in 1934. The blue point has a bluish-white body with slate blue points. The chocolate point was recognized next. In 1955 the lilac point followed and completed the breed. The lilac point has pinkish gray points with a white body which makes it most ethereal and delicate in color. While color is a prominent feature of this breed, structure is also important. The Siamese is a study in length. From the start the breed standard has called for a long, wedge shaped head and elongated body lines. The muscular, tubular body is supported by long legs and graced by a long neck and tail. Paradoxically the short, close lying coat accentuates the long lines perfectly. The long Siamese head is delineated by an absolutely straight profile and well aligned chin. From the front, the outline of the face presents a smooth wedge with large ears that complete the wedge. The outstanding feature of the head is the pair of deep blue almond eyes (an eye’s width apart) which are set at a slant. If you have been able to resist all the other attributes of this breed, the eyes will captivate you. They radiate intelligence and emotion. This ancient breed, perhaps the oldest of all...

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Siamese Cat

This Siamese Cat Article is Listed in Siamese Cat Breed Information

Siamese Cat

Siamese Cat | Breed Profile | Breed History | Breed Description The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognized breeds of Oriental cat. The exact origins of the breed are unknown, but it is believed to be from Southeast Asia, and is said to be descended from the sacred temple cats of Siam (now Thailand). In Thailand, where they are one of several native breeds, they are called Wichien-maat (a name meaning “Moon diamond”). In the twentieth century the Siamese cats became one of the most popular breeds in Europe and North America. They are typically long-lived, 15-20 years is average, and over 20 is not uncommon. The Siamese is one of the first distinctly recognised breeds of Oriental cat. The exact origins of the breed are unknown, but it is believed to be from Southeast Asia, and is said to be descended from the sacred temple cats of Siam (now Thailand). Their Thai name is Wichien Maat.    The pointed cat known in the West as “Siamese” is one of several breeds of cats from Siam described and illustrated in manuscripts called “Tamra Maew” (Cat Poems), estimated to have been written in the 1700s. The breed was first seen outside their Asian home in 1884, when the British Counsul-General in Bangkok, Edward Blencowe Gould (1847-1916), brought a breeding pair of the cats, Pho and Mia, back to Britain as a gift for his sister, Lilian Jane Veley (who went on to be co-founder of the Siamese Cat Club in 1901). Just one year later, three kittens were produced by Pho and Mia. These kittens – Duen Ngai, Kalohom, and Khromata – and their parents were shown at the Crystal Palace Show in 1885, where they made a huge impression because of their unique appearance and distinct behavior. Unfortunately, all three of the kittens died soon after the show. The reason for their deaths is not documented. The following year another pair (with kittens) were imported by a Mrs. Vyvyan and her sister. Compared to the British Shorthair and Persian cats that were familiar to most Britons, these Siamese imports were longer and less “cobby” in body types, had heads that were less round with wedge-shaped muzzles and had larger ears. These differences and the pointed coat pattern which had not been seen before by Westerners, produced a strong impression–one early viewer described them as “an unnatural nightmare of a cat”.  But these striking cats also won some devoted fans and over the next several years fanciers imported a small number of cats, which together these formed the base breeding pool for the entire breed in Britain. It is believed that most Siamese in Britain today are descended from about eleven of these original imports. Several sources give...

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