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Sokoke Breed Description

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Sokoke Breed Description

Sokoke Cat | Breed History | Breed Description The Sokoke is a very active cat. It has kept all its instincts from the nature and this makes the sokoke a very special cat too. If frightened it will “freeze”, tighten its muscles, jump right up and kick off with the hind feet when it lands. It will flee so fast you wouldn’t know where it went before it’s gone. To flee is this cats defense, and the sokoke is not an aggressive cat at all. It flees as long as there is a possibility to do so and will only use theeth or claws if very threatened and stuck in a corner. The Sokoke is a long legged moderate-sized cat with a short dense coat without any undercoat. It looks a little like a ocelot having an “African tabby pattern” with ticked hairs in the dark part of the pattern. It’s movement pattern can be compared with a cheetahs. They mature very slowly, and only reach sexual maturity at the age 1,5-2 years. The body is elegant and very muscular, not cobby. High on the legs, back legs a bit higher than the front legs (as seen in many sprinters, e.g. the cheetah). The head looks small compared to the body. The top of the head between the ears is almost flat and has the same width as the base of an ear, with high, angular well-marked cheek bones. Nose medium long and almost straight. Well defined strong chin. Medium ears in harmony with the head but seem larger. Broad at base with slightly rounded tips, tufts are allowed.The base of the ears is parallel with the lines extending from the corner of the eyes. The ears are always in a listening position. The eyes are almond shaped, obliquely placed. Colour from various shades of amber to light green, outlined with darker colour in accordance with the body colour. The coat is one of the most unusual features of the Sokoke cat. It is shiny and extremely short and elastic, not silky, lying close to the body with no undercoat. It has African tabby-pattern and resembles a blotched tabby, with and “old wood” pattern on the sides, and a sandy ground colour. Pattern colour varies from warm light brown to very dark chestnut brown almost black. There are absolutely no white hairs on a Sokoke cat.  The tail is long, thin, stiff and whiplike with broad rings. However lately a few “snow Sokokes” has been born. They have the blotched tabby pattern on the body (from cream to greyish beige). There are stripes in the same colour all the way up the legs, striped tail and a “masked” face. They are without necklaces and belly spots. All paw pads...

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Sokoke Breed History

This Sokoke Breed History Article is Listed in Sokoke Cat Breed Information

Sokoke Breed History

Sokoke Cat | Breed History | Breed Description The true origin of the Sokoke cat is still a mystery. The breed is without doubt a domestic cat from Kenya that lived without human interference for a long time. How long is not known. The mystery lays in the pattern, the classic tabby – called African tabby among Sokoke breeders and owners. This pattern is one thought to have originated in Europe, so how did it get to Africa on the Sokoke cat? The classic tabby is not a pattern to be found on the typical domestic cat in Eastern Africa. At one point this breed probably got in contact with a Siamese pointed cat, or a carrier for this gene. This is the only likely explanation on the appearance of snow Sokokes, which are Siamese pointed. For this gene to evolve twice in domestic cats history is so to speak impossible. Except for the pattern and the Siamese gene the sokoke has little in common with other breeds of pedigree cats.   The Sokoke was accepted by FIFe in 1993, as the second breed being accepted by FIFe before the recognition by other cat organizations. There is now two forest cats, the Norwegian and the Afro-Danish Sokoke making their mark on the world of cats. It originates from the Sokoke Arabuke forest on the Kenyan coast, one of the few remaining but rapidly dimishing, rainforests in East Africa. Historically, we can only find one reference to the Sokoke Forest Cat. This is in the Giriama tribal name for cat “Kadzonzo”. The Giriama tribe have lived traditionally around the forest for hundreds of years. All the tribal elders we have known can describe the best of the Sokoke cats perfectly and can differentiate from the three wild genera, as well as the domestic breeds. This is proof of the cats’ very close relationship with the old culture. Today’s Giriama tend to be ignorant of the Kadzonzo. I believe this is deliberate and has deep sociological reasons…. the modern Giriama do not wish to associate with the primitive, but fairly recent, survival behaviour of the past. All the older generations discussing Kadzonzo say, ” the cat was very sweet to eat”. We assume from this it was part of the general diet. The cats were probably eaten in preference to the domestic stock, which represented wealth. The old culture had many forms of survival which are now “unacceptable” to the modern Giriama. Therefore “Kadzonzo” is conveniently forgotten. Indeed the name Kadzonzo is almost an embarrassment to some. Not much was known about the Sokoke cat before the Kenyan farmer Jeni Slater in 1978 found a litter of kittens in her coconut plantation. Jeni Slater is an experienced horsebreeder and found the...

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Sokoke Cat

This Sokoke Cat Article is Listed in Sokoke Cat Breed Information

Sokoke Cat

Sokoke Cat | Breed History | Breed Description The Sokoke is a breed of cat. The original name of the breed was Khadzonzos. The Khadzonzos cats were discovered in the Arabuko Sokoke forest, on the Kenyan coast, by Jeni Slater in 1978. Gloria Moeldrop, a friend of Slater’s, brought some of the cats home with her to Denmark to breed. In 1990, she imported more cats from Kenya to strengthen the breeding stock. The original name of the breed was Khadzonzos. This name was given to the cat by the local people, the Giriama tribe, who had known of the cat for a considerable time. It is speculated that this breed of cat had been around for possibly centuries before the intervention of the West. “Khadzonzo” means “look like tree bark” in the language of the Giriama people and it is plain to see why. The coat of this cat is a modified tabby (a marbled appearance much like the marbled Bengal), which looks like tree bark.    The Sokoke is a breed of cat. The original name of the breed was Khadzonzos. The Khadzonzos cats were discovered in the Arabuko-Sokoke forest, on the Kenyan coast, by Jeni Slater in 1978. Gloria Moeldrop, a friend of Slater’s, brought some of the cats home with her to Denmark to breed. The Khadzonzos cats were discovered in the Arabuko-Sokoke forest, on the Kenyan coast, by Jeni Slater in 1978. Gloria Moeldrop, a friend of Slater’s, brought some of the cats home with her to Denmark to breed because Jeni Slater feared for the survival of the cat in Kenya. In 1990, she imported more cats from Kenya to strengthen the breeding stock. The cats were first shown in Copenhagen in 1984. The breed was officially recognized by the FIFe in 1993, with the name changed to Sokoke, after where they came from. There has been some speculation as to whether this is a domestic cat or a descendant of a wild cat that has domesticated itself. DNA testing has confirmed no wild genes however. The Sokoke appears to have been a feral domestic cat. Sokoke cats (or African Shorthair) originated from the Sokoke Arabuke forest in Kenia and became known in Europe in the 20th century. In 1978 a Kenyan farmer found a litter of kittens in a coconut plantation. They were very special with a “blotched tabby” pattern and “foreign” body type. Like many African species, these cats are virtually extinct in the wild. Sokokes have blotched tabby coats in shades of brown, with amber to light green eyes. The center of the patterns are hollow looking due to the agouti gene producing a “salt and pepper” look. Their coats are short and coarse, with little to no undercoat. Accordingly...

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